This Is Not A Love Song, Part III: Weegee

This is not a love editorial. Somehow, this wants to be a sort of an introduction into another world, where, love exists, don’t worry, but, in other forms, more rudimental, more vivid, more natural, without that tricks you are seeing, daily, on TV or which airs on the Radio Station, tender and sweet and namby-pamby shity songs. To be short, we are searching for the unconventional face of love. We will introduce you some sort of artists who see this feeling – love – with those eyes that we wanted to see too. You will see what is all about and we hope you will enjoy our unconventional love. 

Weegee, born Usher Fellig on June 12, 1899 in the town of Lemburg (now in Ukraine), first worked as a photographer at age fourteen, three years after his family immigrated to the United States, where his first name was changed to the more American-sounding Arthur

Weegee published his photographs in several books, including Naked City (1945), Weegee’s People (1946), and Naked Hollywood (1953). After moving to Hollywood in 1947, he devoted most of his energy to making 16-millimeter films and photographs for his Distortions series, a project that resulted in experimental portraits of celebrities and political figures. He returned to New York in 1952 and lectured and wrote about photography until his death on December 27, 1968.

Well, let’s see what Mr. Weegee has to tell us about love, with his art. Photography in that period was just about art and catching the sincerly emotions of streets, not just a sort of trend who is very catchy for girls at puberty. 

Weegee can be seen as the American counterpart to Brassaï, who photographed Paris street scenes at night. Weegee’s themes of nudists, circus performers, freaks and street people were later taken up and developed by Diane Arbus in the early 1960s.

 

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